The Park

The Park

The park of the Villa is about 5 hectares and is circumvented by a large stone wall. The main, south side entrance of the Villa marks the splendor of the House of Buonvisi through four large gray stone columns richly decorated with white Carrara marble.

The gate opens onto a long cypress alley leading up to the south facade of the Villa. One of the peculiarities of the garden is a carpino pergola that runs parallel to the south-north axis of the cypress alley.

This pergola is unique in its style and consists of carpini trees rather than the more common vine or jasmine. The irregular terrain on the south side of the villa is terraced and separated by walls. Facing the Villa, on the right hand side of the alley is a ‘stanza di verzura’ delineated by yew (Taxus baccata L.) and laurel (Laurus nobilis L.); in the shady center of the ‘stanza’ is a gray stone table flanked by two stone benches.

Further on, towards the Villa is a waterfall coming from the upper level of the park and pouring into a large basin lined by terracotta statues. On the left-hand side of the alley still facing the Villa is a flat ground now planted with eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.). This area to the west of the Villa was originally planted with fruit trees and vineyards.
The gate opens onto a long cypress alley leading up to the south facade of the Villa. One of the peculiarities of the garden is a carpino pergola that runs parallel to the south-north axis of the cypress alley.

This pergola is unique in its style and consists of carpini trees rather than the more common vine or jasmine. The irregular terrain on the south side of the villa is terraced and separated by walls. Facing the Villa, on the right hand side of the alley is a ‘stanza di verzura’ delineated by yew (Taxus baccata L.) and laurel (Laurus nobilis L.); in the shady center of the ‘stanza’ is a gray stone table flanked by two stone benches.

Further on, towards the Villa is a waterfall coming from the upper level of the park and pouring into a large basin lined by terracotta statues. On the left-hand side of the alley still facing the Villa is a flat ground now planted with eucalyptus (Eucalyptus globulus Labill.). This area to the west of the Villa was originally planted with fruit trees and vineyards.

The beauty of the garden is underlined by fountains which work with the abundance of water in the area. The most remarkable fountain of the park the so called “Fontana della Sirena” located at the northern edge of the park.
On its top there is the Buonvisi Coat of Arms. Also in the northern part of the garden is an artificial cave typical of Italian renaissance garden architecture.

In the center of the cave sitting on a rock is a “putto” crowned by horses and small winged “putti” with fish tails. Beyond its aesthetic appeal this fountain has also a central function in the distribution of water and irrigation throughout the garden.
A particularity of the fountain indicating its eventual purpose is the view it gives to the irrigated terrain through an opening. A fountain of the baroque era, which is to this day still crowned by a Buonvisi coat of arms is the so called “Fontana dell’ Abbondanza” is situated in the eastern part of the park.

The statue at the center of the fountain emerges from a niche held in the same grey stone and white marble pattern, which we find in the columns of the main entrance built in the 16th century.

Today the Park has only slightly changed from its original layout and we can still find the plants such as limes (Tilia platyphyllos Scop.), maples (Acer campestre L.), farns (Quercus robur L.) holly (Ilex aquifolium L.) and carpini (Carpinus betulus L.) that were mentioned in the first recorded description of the Villa in 1593.
Moreover we find the typical Italian garden plants such as boxus (Buxus sempervirens L.), yew (Taxus baccata L.) and oak (Quercus ilex L.).

In the eastern part of the garden we can also admire various rare species of plants from all over the world such as the smelled olive (Osmanthus fragrans Lour.) and the rarest one the Osmanthus armatus Diel, the cypress of Monterey (Cupressus macrocarpa Hartweg), the felloia (Feljoa sellowiana O.Berg.), the so called tree of fan (Ginkgo Biloba L.), from China, and is as a species unchanged since the mesozoica era.

Among the most impressive trees we also find the Judas’s Tree (Cercis siliquastrum L.) the popular name referring to a tree on which Judas the traitor of Jesus hung himself according to the gospel. And finally the Poncirus trifoliata (L.) the only citrus fruit shedding its leaves. All the various species and many more are harmoniously placed in this spectacular park.